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NASA ready to hit the moon in search for water - and you can watch

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

October 5, 2009

Grab your telescope or turn on your computer. Either way, you can watch when NASA satellites crash into the moon Friday night in search of water. NASA's Centaur booster rocket, followed by the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) are scheduled to hit the Cabeus crater near the Moon's south pole Oct. 9 in a two-part planned crash. To watch, click on NASA TV on your computer at 10:15 UT (6:15 a.m. EDT) or set up your telescope in the backyard. The Hubble Space Telescope, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and, NASA said, hundreds of telescopes great and small on Earth will scrutinize the two plumes, looking for signs of water and the unexpected.

For more information, maps and educational information, visit the NASA-LCROSS Viewer's Guide.

American Water launches innovative desalination technology in partnership with Netherlands-based organizations

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

Oct. 4, 2009

American Water Works Company, Inc. (NYSE: AWK) has partnered with Vitens, RWB Waterservices, the University of Twente and WE Consult to launch a $2.5 million to $3 million innovative desalination technology project, according to an American Water announcement. The partnership with the Netherlands-based organizations is the first for American Water's new Innovation Development Process, an initiative that combines American Water’s research and development, technical expertise, and infrastructure assets with innovations from within the company and from business partners to create greater efficiencies in the areas of water reuse, desalination, wastewater operations and bio-energy. The “Clean Operator” project is co-funded by subsidiary SenterNovem and aims to reduce the costs, environmental impact and carbon footprint of desalination. In the Clean Operator project, the partners will develop new technologies for seawater
desalination and the treatment of surface water and wastewater using Reverse Osmosis membranes, according to an American Water news release. (read the full story)

earn how your organization can republish this story at no cost.

Almost back to normal: Corps of Engineers releases draft Missouri River operating plan

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

September 30, 2009

After nearly 10 years of drought, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers anticipates a return to nearly normal water operations along the Missouri River, according to the proposed 2009-2010 annual plan. A draft of the Annual Operating Plan for the Missouri River was released for public comment Sept. 28 with a series of public meetings scheduled for Nebraska, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Missouri. Oral and written comments will be accepted by the Corps until Nov. 20. The draft plan anticipates that with normal or above normal runoff, there will be a full service, full length 2010 navigation season. The final determination on season length will be made after the reservoir storage check on July 1, 2010.

read the full story

Download a pdf of the 2009-2010 draft Missouri River Annual Operating Plan

learn how your organization can republish this story at no cost.

Foreign nuts and bolts OK'd for stimulus water projects - EPA

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

Aug. 10, 2009

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today issued a waiver of Buy American requirements for small amounts of foreign-made parts in $6 billion worth of state and municipal water projects. Such “de minimis” foreign iron, steel and other manufactured goods cannot make up more than five percent of the total cost of materials in the project, the EPA announcement said. A shortage of U.S.-made small parts or difficulty in determining where they are made, including some types of nuts, bolts, tubing and gaskets, reportedly has been slowing approval of state and municipal drinking water and wastewater treatment and distribution projects that rely on stimulus funds.

Read the full story and learn how your organization can republish the story at no cost

Biggest U.S. desal plant ‘by far’ made public by San Diego, California water agency

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

May 14, 2009

A San Diego County Water Authority committee Thursday unveiled plans to build a seawater desalination plant on the Marine Corps base at Camp Pendleton that would be ‘by far’ the largest in the U.S. The 50 million-to-150 million-gallon per day project will cost more than $2 billion, if built to full capacity. And, it could supply enough additional water to meet the needs of 24 agencies, including the city of San Diego, that buy water wholesale from the county authority, said Water Resources Manager Bob Yamada. At full capacity, the proposed reverse osmosis plant would be three times larger than the $300 million Poseidon Resources plant in near-by Carlsbad, according to the Water Authority’s summary feasibility study. (Full Story)

Corps of Engineers says Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River water conditions back to 'normal'

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

June 1, 2009

The Army Corps of Engineers said today adequate rainfall in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Rivers watershed means management of the region can return to 'normal' following a three-year drought. At the height of the Southeast U.S. drought zone 4 water management restrictions, the most severe possible, were in place along the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint rivers, triggering heightened arguments over water sharing between Georgia, Florida and Alabama. The Corps' Mobile District Public Affairs Officer, E. Patrick Robbins, said in the news release that “due to the lower lakes being at full summer levels we should be able to meet downstream needs with normal basin inflow for the foreseeable future. Releases from Lake Lanier will continue to be just for water quality and water supply requirements at this time.” (Full Story)

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist urges Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to work for solution to tri-state water war

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

May 29, 2009

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist told Interior Secretary Ken Salazar it is "imperative" that a long-term solution be found to end the water sharing conflict between Florida, Georgia and Alabama. "As you are aware, Florida, Georgia, Alabama and the Federal Agencies continue to be embroiled in lawsuits and controversy over the management of the reservoirs on the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint River systems," Crist wrote in a May 28 letter to Salazar. "This is a tri-state problem which requires a tri-state solution." Salazar was in Georgia and Florida this week and met with Crist and Georgia Gov. Sony Perdue, in part to discuss the water sharing conflict. (Full Story)

Download a pdf of Crist's letter to Salazar

Aquamantra teams with ENSO Bottles to become first water in 100% biodegradable bottles

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

March 10, 2009

California-based Aquamantra water will be the first corporation to use 100% biodegradable bottles that manufacturer ENSO Bottles will make available this spring, according to an Aquamantra announcement. The bottles also can be recycled into other products. The goal, said Aquamantra founder and president Alexandra Teklak, is to cut the amount of non-degradable plastic in landfills, an issue that a number of cities have cited in removing bottled water from government offices. Only a year old, ENSO Bottles of  Phoenix, Ariz., was created, according to its web site, "through the collaborated effort of bottle manufactures looking to provide earth friendly PET bottling solutions." ENSO Bottles, according to Teresa Clark, vice president of sales and marketing, are 100% biodegradable, decompose in about five years and add only "pennies" to the cost of a bottle of water or other product. Like traditional PET bottles, the ENSO bottles also can be recycled into other products. And they don't need special treatment. They can be mixed in with PET bottles and recycled. Aquamantra is the first company to announce it will use ENSO Bottles, said Clark, but the company has orders for 2.5 billion from other corporations. Read the full story

U.S. Conference of Mayors votes to ban bottled water

WaterWebster.org staff report

June 23, 2008

Mayors representing about 250 U.S. cities voted Monday to ban bottled water from city meetings and offices, except in cases of emergency. On a voice vote, members of the U.S. Conference of Mayors supported a resolution proposed by San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom that urges all mayors to phase out, “where feasible,” bottled water and support municipal water, said conference spokesperson Elena Temple. Newsom earlier estimated San Francisco saved $1 million by using tap water instead of bottled. Co-sponsors of the resolution represented cities large and small, from New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Chicago’s Richard Daley, to Mayors Joseph A. Curtatone of Somerville, Ma., and Dan Coody of Fayetteville, Ar. Both Somerville and Fayetteville have populations under 80,00. (full story)

 

2009 Original News Stories and Features

MIT research points to carbon in man-made ponds as catalyst for arsenic contamination in Bangladeshi drinking water

Civil & Environmental Engineering Researchers in MIT's Department of Civil and Environmental Engineering believe they have pinpointed a pathway by which arsenic may be contaminating the drinking water in Bangladesh, a phenomenon that has puzzled scientists, world health agencies and the Bangladeshi government for nearly 30 years. The research suggests that human alteration to the landscape, the construction of villages with ponds, and the adoption of irrigated agriculture are responsible for the current pattern of arsenic concentration underground. The findings also indicate that drinking-water wells drilled to a greater depth would likely provide clean water. Bangladesh is the seventh most populous country in the world, and tens of millions of its citizens have been exposed to arsenic in their water over the past several decades. As many as 3,000 Bangladeshis die from arsenic-induced cancer each year and today approximately 2 million people in the country live with arsenic poisoning, which manifests as skin lesions and neurological disorders, and causes cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases and cancer. Allan H. Smith a professor of epidemiology at the University of California, Berkeley, calls it “the largest mass poisoning of a population in history." News Release_ 11/16/09

NASA ready to hit the moon in search for water - and you can watch

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

October 5, 2009

Grab your telescope or turn on your computer. Either way, you can watch when NASA satellites crash into the moon Friday night in search of water. NASA's Centaur booster rocket, followed by the Lunar Crater Observation and Sensing Satellite (LCROSS) are scheduled to hit the Cabeus crater near the Moon's south pole Oct. 9 in a two-part planned crash. To watch, click on NASA TV on your computer at 10:15 UT (6:15 a.m. EDT) or set up your telescope in the backyard. The Hubble Space Telescope, the Lunar Reconnaissance Orbiter (LRO) and, NASA said, hundreds of telescopes great and small on Earth will scrutinize the two plumes, looking for signs of water and the unexpected.

For more information, maps and educational information, visit the NASA-LCROSS Viewer's Guide.

American Water launches innovative desalination technology in partnership with Netherlands-based organizations

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

Oct. 4, 2009

American Water Works Company, Inc. (NYSE: AWK) has partnered with Vitens, RWB Waterservices, the University of Twente and WE Consult to launch a $2.5 million to $3 million innovative desalination technology project, according to an American Water announcement. The partnership with the Netherlands-based organizations is the first for American Water's new Innovation Development Process, an initiative that combines American Water’s research and development, technical expertise, and infrastructure assets with innovations from within the company and from business partners to create greater efficiencies in the areas of water reuse, desalination, wastewater operations and bio-energy. The “Clean Operator” project is co-funded by subsidiary SenterNovem and aims to reduce the costs, environmental impact and carbon footprint of desalination. In the Clean Operator project, the partners will develop new technologies for seawater
desalination and the treatment of surface water and wastewater using Reverse Osmosis membranes, according to an American Water news release. (read the full story)

earn how your organization can republish this story at no cost.

Almost back to normal: Corps of Engineers releases draft Missouri River operating plan

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

September 30, 2009

After nearly 10 years of drought, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers anticipates a return to nearly normal water operations along the Missouri River, according to the proposed 2009-2010 annual plan. A draft of the Annual Operating Plan for the Missouri River was released for public comment Sept. 28 with a series of public meetings scheduled for Nebraska, Montana, North Dakota, South Dakota and Missouri. Oral and written comments will be accepted by the Corps until Nov. 20. The draft plan anticipates that with normal or above normal runoff, there will be a full service, full length 2010 navigation season. The final determination on season length will be made after the reservoir storage check on July 1, 2010.

read the full story

Download a pdf of the 2009-2010 draft Missouri River Annual Operating Plan

learn how your organization can republish this story at no cost.

Lawrence Township, New Jersey water system bought by Aqua America

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

Aug. 12, 2009

The Lawrenceville Water Company has been purchased by Aqua America for $3.3 million, including assumption of $400,000 in debt, Aqua America announced today. The water company serves 8,000 people in Lawrence Township, New Jersey. Aqua American Chairman and CEO Nicholas DeBenedictis said in a news release the acquisition increases the company's New Jersey customer base by five percent. Aqua America subsidiary Aqua New Jersey, Inc., will operate and manage the Lawrenceville system.

Read the full story; learn how your organization can republish this story at no cost.

Foreign nuts and bolts OK'd for stimulus water projects - EPA

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

Aug. 10, 2009

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency today issued a waiver of Buy American requirements for small amounts of foreign-made parts in $6 billion worth of state and municipal water projects. Such “de minimis” foreign iron, steel and other manufactured goods cannot make up more than five percent of the total cost of materials in the project, the EPA announcement said. A shortage of U.S.-made small parts or difficulty in determining where they are made, including some types of nuts, bolts, tubing and gaskets, reportedly has been slowing approval of state and municipal drinking water and wastewater treatment and distribution projects that rely on stimulus funds.

Read the full story and learn how your organization can republish the story at no cost

Maynilad Water Services awards Philippines' largest membrane water filtration project to Pall Corporation

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

June 8, 2009

Pall Corporation announced today that it won a $14.7 million contract to design and install the Philippines's first large-scale membrane filtration plant, a 100 million liters per day project in Manila. The contract was awarded by Maynilad Water Services and the project will begin producing water in 2010. East Hills, New York-based Pall will install a Pall Aria™ integrated microfiltration (MF)/ reverse osmosis (RO) membrane water treatment system. (Full Story)

Corps of Engineers says Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint River water conditions back to 'normal'

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

June 1, 2009

The Army Corps of Engineers said today adequate rainfall in the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint Rivers watershed means management of the region can return to 'normal' following a three-year drought. At the height of the Southeast U.S. drought zone 4 water management restrictions, the most severe possible, were in place along the Apalachicola-Chattahoochee-Flint rivers, triggering heightened arguments over water sharing between Georgia, Florida and Alabama. The Corps' Mobile District Public Affairs Officer, E. Patrick Robbins, said in the news release that “due to the lower lakes being at full summer levels we should be able to meet downstream needs with normal basin inflow for the foreseeable future. Releases from Lake Lanier will continue to be just for water quality and water supply requirements at this time.” (Full Story)

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist urges Interior Secretary Ken Salazar to work for solution to tri-state water war

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

May 29, 2009

Florida Gov. Charlie Crist told Interior Secretary Ken Salazar it is "imperative" that a long-term solution be found to end the water sharing conflict between Florida, Georgia and Alabama. "As you are aware, Florida, Georgia, Alabama and the Federal Agencies continue to be embroiled in lawsuits and controversy over the management of the reservoirs on the Apalachicola, Chattahoochee and Flint River systems," Crist wrote in a May 28 letter to Salazar. "This is a tri-state problem which requires a tri-state solution." Salazar was in Georgia and Florida this week and met with Crist and Georgia Gov. Sony Perdue, in part to discuss the water sharing conflict. (Full Story)

Download a pdf of Crist's letter to Salazar

Biggest U.S. desal plant ‘by far’ made public by San Diego, California water agency

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

May 14, 2009

A San Diego County Water Authority committee Thursday unveiled plans to build a seawater desalination plant on the Marine Corps base at Camp Pendleton that would be ‘by far’ the largest in the U.S. The 50 million-to-150 million-gallon per day project will cost more than $2 billion, if built to full capacity. And, it could supply enough additional water to meet the needs of 24 agencies, including the city of San Diego, that buy water wholesale from the county authority, said Water Resources Manager Bob Yamada. At full capacity, the proposed reverse osmosis plant would be three times larger than the $300 million Poseidon Resources plant in near-by Carlsbad, according to the Water Authority’s summary feasibility study. (Full Story)

International Bottled Water Association files federal law suit to block sections of New York's bottled water bill

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

Published May 19, 2009; Updated May 23, 2009

The International Bottled Water Assn. (IBWA), two of its leading members and environmental activist Robert F. Kennedy Jr., owner of a small water bottling company, have filed a federal law suit against the state of New York to block parts of the state's new bottled water law. Backers of the suit, including Nestle Waters North America, Inc., Massachusett-based bottler, Polar Corporation, better known as Polar Beverages, and Kennedy, owner of Keeper Springs, a Honesdale, Pennsylvania, bottler,  argue the pending law unfairly applies to plain bottled water but exempts water with sugar added. Such products include teas and sports drinks. In addition, they said it interferes with interstate commerce and may actually hurt recycling efforts rather than help them. The suit, filed May 19 in U.S. District Court in Manhattan, also argues that New York didn't give bottlers enough time to comply with the law. It was enacted in April as an expansion of an existing New York "Bottle Bill," and takes effect June 1. (read full story)

U.S. Army Corps of Engineers announces $293 million in economic recovery projects for Florida, Georgia, Alabama and Mississippi

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

April 28, 2009

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers Tuesday released a list of 172 construction  and maintenance projects in Alabama, Mississippi, Georgia and Florida to be built with $293 million in economic recovery funds.The energy and water development projects are part of an overall $4.6 billion appropriation for the Corps' Civil Works national program that was signed into law Feb. 17 by Pres. Barack Obama. read full story
Complete list of Corps projects

Aquamantra teams with ENSO Bottles to become first water in 100% biodegradable bottles

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

March 10, 2009

California-based Aquamantra water will be the first corporation to use 100% biodegradable bottles that manufacturer ENSO Bottles will make available this spring, according to an Aquamantra announcement. The bottles also can be recycled into other products.

The goal, said Aquamantra founder and president Alexandra Teklak, is to cut the amount of non-degradable plastic in landfills, an issue that a number of cities have cited in removing bottled water from government offices.

Only a year old, ENSO Bottles of  Phoenix, Ariz., was created, according to its web site, "through the collaborated effort of bottle manufactures looking to provide earth friendly PET bottling solutions."

ENSO Bottles, according to Teresa Clark, vice president of sales and marketing, are 100% biodegradable, decompose in about five years and add only "pennies" to the cost of a bottle of water or other product. Like traditional PET bottles, the ENSO bottles also can be recycled into other products. And they don't need special treatment. They can be mixed in with PET bottles and recycled.

Aquamantra is the first company to announce it will use ENSO Bottles, said Clark, but the company has orders for 2.5 billion from other corporations. Read the full story

 

2008 Original News Stories and Features

International Bottled Water Association offers ‘olive branch’ to critics

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

September 16, 2008

The International Bottled Water Association is asking its critics to join it in working for solutions to environmental issues such as recycling, protecting watersheds and improving municipal infrastructure. The “informal olive branch” was extended to five environmental groups in an article written by IBWA Vice President for Communications Tom Lauria. The article, titled “An Open Letter to Environmentalists,” appears in the August/September 2008 industry publication Bottled Water Reporter. The IBWA is the trade association representing the bottled water industry. According to the Sept. 15 IBWA news release, copies of Lauria’s article were sent to the presidents of the Sierra Club, the Natural Resources Defense Council, the Environmental Working Group, Clean Water Action and Food and Water Watch.

(Read the full story)

U.S. Conference of Mayors votes to ban bottled water

WaterWebster.org staff report

June 23, 2008

Mayors representing about 250 U.S. cities voted Monday to ban bottled water from city meetings and offices, except in cases of emergency. On a voice vote, members of the U.S. Conference of Mayors supported a resolution proposed by San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom that urges all mayors to phase out, “where feasible,” bottled water and support municipal water, said conference spokesperson Elena Temple. Newsom earlier estimated San Francisco saved $1 million by using tap water instead of bottled. Co-sponsors of the resolution represented cities large and small, from New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg and Chicago’s Richard Daley, to Mayors Joseph A. Curtatone of Somerville, Ma., and Dan Coody of Fayetteville, Ar. Both Somerville and Fayetteville have populations under 80,00. (full story)

Bottled water competes with city budgets at U.S. Conference of Mayors' annual meeting

WaterWebster.org staff report

June 20, 2008

It’s bottled vs. tap this weekend as mayors from across the country gather for the annual meeting of the U.S. Conference of Mayors, and a vote that could banish the bottle from city meetings and offices. A resolution scheduled for a vote Monday urges cities to phase out the use of bottled water except in emergency situations. It was proposed by San Francisco Mayor Gavin Newsom, who estimated a ban on bottled water saved his city $1 million, and is backed by New York Mayor Michael Bloomberg. But it’s not just the larger cities that support the ban. Dan Coody, mayor of Fayetteville, Arkansas, population 68,000-plus, and co-chair of the Conference’s Water Council, said his city discontinued the use of bottled water several years ago. Coody said he didn’t know how much bottled water cost the city, but the main issues included spending money for water that in many cases “is exactly the same quality as what’s right next to you in the kitchen.” (full story)

U.S. Conference of Mayors begins its discussion of bottled water

WaterWebster.org Staff Report

May 1, 2008

The U.S. Conference of Mayors today began its discussion of how bottled water contributes to solid waste. The meeting in New York City was convened as the result of a municipal water resolution the Conference of Mayors adopted at its June, 2007 meeting in Los Angeles titled The Importance of Municipal Water. Presentations also were made by representatives of The American Beverage Association and The International Bottled Water Association on new information on industry efforts to reduce the amount of materials used in plastic water bottles and water conservation in bottled water production processes. San Francisco, Albuquerque, Minneapolis, Seattle, and other cities have banned the purchase of single-serve bottled water by their city departments since 2007, citing concerns about the cost of bottled water and its impact on city budgets, as well as and bottled water’s contribution to solid waste.

read the full story

Bottled water industry response to U.S. Conference of Mayors' Water Council meeting News Release_ 5/2/08

Underwriters Laboratories launches bottled water safety certification program

WaterWebster staff report

April 14, 2008

The new Underwriters Laboratories (UL) certification mark will enable bottled water companies to demonstrate to the public that the quality and safety of the water has been validated by a third party, UL said in a news release. Under the program, UL will independently test water for bottlers who want the certification label. If the water passes the tests, UL will certify to consumers that it meets Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) requirements. In addition, UL said it has “extensive analytical capabilities for contaminants of emerging concern including pharmaceuticals and is happy to offer this testing to bottled water producers who are interested in this service.” The Associated Press last month reported on the prevalence of small amounts of drugs in U.S. water supplies. In the summer of 2007, UL commissioned a blind market research study to quantify the value of the UL Mark among U.S. consumers of bottled water. According to the company announcement, the study found that in every tested scenario there was significant consumer preference for bottled water brands that carry the UL Mark, and that many consumers would switch brands or pay more to get the benefits of the UL Mark. (full story)

West Virginia's Tumai water brings hope to Africa

WaterWebster staff report

April 2, 2008

Bob Downey is exporting hope from Martinsburg, West Virginia to South Africa and other areas of the African continent, one sip at a time. Downey created the Spero Group after working as an engineer on a project in Africa and seeing the kind of help that many in Africa need. In Latin, the word spero means hope. The Spero Group in turn formed the nonprofit bottled water company Tumai, which is Swahili for “to hope for." At least 15% of the profits from sales of the bottled water are used “specifically to fund the projects we do in Africa,” said Downey. Those projects include assistance for two orphanages in South Africa and work with groups like Engineers Without Borders in other parts of Africa. Among the projects the bottled water sales help underwrite are permanent drinking water well systems and improved sanitation, Downey said. (full story)

US recalls 18,000 children's water bottles because of lead hazard

WaterWebster Staff Report

March 25, 2008

The U.S. Consumer Product Safety Commission today recalled about 18,000 children's water  bottles made in China because paint on the outside of the bottles violated lead safety standards. There are no known injuries reported from using the bottles which were sold between February 2006 and February 2008 but parents were urged to immediately take them away from children. A news release from the federal agency said the bottles were manufactured in China for Downeast Concepts Inc. of Yarmouth, Maine, and sold under the product name Backyard and Beyond Metal Water Bottles.

Penta Water study shows skin benefits

By Elaine Barrington

WaterWebster Staff Writer

March 23, 2008

Penta Water Company reports a study it commissioned shows human skin may benefit from the firm's bottled water. A Penta announcement said the company hired Dr. Jean Krutmann, Professor of Dermatology and Environmental Medicine and Director of the Institute for Environmental Medical Research at the Heinrich Heine University, Dusseldorf, Germany to conduct a study of the benefits of its bottled water. According to the study, human skin cells cultured in Penta Water had significantly less damage from ultraviolet radiation than skin cells cultured in plain water, the company said. It said the findings support Penta's claim that its water may act as an anti-oxidant and promote anti-aging. To confirm the findings, Penta said it is paying The University of California, Davis, to conduct additional studies on Penta Water. Penta says its water, which comes from San Diego city water, may have anti-oxidizing effects because Penta Water is first cleaned using a state of the art purification system to remove all chemicals, particles and impurities.

GAO asked to investigate impact of bottled water use

By WaterWebster.org staff

Learn how your organization can reprint this article at no cost

The public debate over widespread use of bottled drinking water moved to Washington Thursday. Leaders of a House environmental subcommittee asked for an examination of the fast-growing industry’s impact on resources and consumers.The chair and vice chair of the House Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Environment and Hazardous Materials urged the Government Accountability Office (GAO) to conduct the inquiry. Reps. Albert R. Wynn (D-Md), the subcommittee chair and Hilda Solis (D-Ca), the vice chair, also asked the GAO to separately scrutinize the Environmental Protection Agency’s safety standards for TCE, perchlorate and other drinking water contaminants, according to a news release.On the issue of consumers switching from tap water to bottled, the International Bottled Water Association (IBWA) said in a news release it will work with the GAO on the study but believes the safety, quality and labeling of bottled water already are well-regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and state governments.

 

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Special Reports

from

WaterWebster.org

 
  • Water is Key: A Better Future for Africa by Gil Garcetti; edited by Peter Gleick; Garcetti photographs the hope that safe water brings to West Africa. 2007 Balcony Press (for the quick- download, text-only version, click here)

 

 

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Our mission is to provide safe drinking water news and information free of charge to anyone who needs it, anywhere in the world.

 

 

 

 

 

 
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